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, invested time, invested money, did not pick up the state. what's important is virginia, florida and ohio. mike, you've got some inside dope on virginia and florida in particular. >> yeah. just to set the stage for the drama of the next hour or so, the mitt romney math starts in florida, virginia, then moves on to ohio. from the war rooms of both campaigns, virginia is -- [inaudible] obama. now, the states are very close in the actual count, and we're trying to be clear here on our coverage about when a state is actually called and what the campaigns are doing, but we're also trying to pull back the curtain a little bit for you on what the campaigns are thinking. before the calls are made, what we're hearing. and just to give you a sense of what the mood is among republicans tonight, one of the top republicans in the country just e-mailed me talking about 2014, says there's another race in two years. so that tells you that the top republicans are hearing things from various states that aren't encouraging. florida, where the romney math starts, 50/50. hundreds of votes out of millions cast
how it works. whereas texas and florida are giving an idea of how you can govern without an income tax. people moved. we kind of know what is going to happen here. indiana, illinois, big border. they just past the right to work and they're giving the school kids a choice of a falter scholarship. illinois raised taxes want to inform the government worker pension system. who is going to build a factory in the 100 miles on the western side of the border? any takers for the people that think jobs and opportunities are going to move into illinois or not? what if we know something isn't going to work? do we impose it nationally when we watch it fail at the state level? not all are heading to warmer climates but states with no income tax or lower taxes and less spending. less government services. people move to the states with fewer government services. really? then why do we pretended that is what people want as opposed to what the unionized bureaucracies in the state government says it wants. we also see the tests on louisiana and in the and i have a half a million people, 100,000 in arizon
of a small troop of men, army soldiers, marching from one place toot in florida, which was like the far side of the moon to most americans at that time. and what that did was set in motion a moment that led too a war against the seminole indians. one of the overlooked moments in our past, which is something else i always tried to do. tell the stories that the textbooks leave out. most americans had never heard of the longest, most costly war in american history, until vietnam, which was the seminole war fought in florida, so that was as gripping and astan issuing to people of that time as 9/11 was to us. pearl harbor was again. so each generation has had one of these moments, and we do forget that we've been through this before. obviously we're going through it right now in a sense. i'm a new yorker. i'm here in new york, and we are living through this extraordinary moment, and i just want to say briefly, thank you, to the people who are expressing such concern and care for new york and this region. we have a long way to go, and a lot to do. in fact on my way into the studio this more than i
, also known as sequestration. follow all the florida-based starting tuesday with white house coverage on c-span and the senate on c-span2. >> next, fox news channel contributor michael barone and norman ornstein examined election results. this event was hosted by the american enterprise institute. it's just under two hours. >> good afternoon. minus karlyn bowman, i'm a senior fellow here at aei, and on behalf of my aei colleague, michael broken norm ornstein and henry olsen, and our c-span viewers, i'd like to invite all of you to this final session of the aei election watch 2012 season. i'd like to breed and produce one of our colleagues, ben wattenberg, who helped to start the aei election watch series in 1982. ease with us here today. ben wattenberg and the late richard scam and were the first people to look at the interaction of demography and public opinion data in the 1970 book, the real majority. they told us that important changing demographics of the two future elections, and in this election are pathbreaking insights have been confirmed. like he knows were a larger share of
as i told you yesterday in the presidential race, in florida has yet to be called here is the absentee ballot voting delay to push right on the floor of the election. we don't know where the 29 electoral votes will go but have made every outcome of the presidential election. back to the topic here. what was your message to washington? a lot of newspaper articles this morning about the fiscal the cliff and that is what faces -- >> we will leave this portion of this morning's washington journal now to go live to the american enterprise institute for panel discussions on the election with fox news channel commentator michael barone, inside out columnist norman borkenstein and others. it is just beginning. this is live coverage from c-span2. >> to start the aei series in 1982. he is with us here today been lautenberg and the late richard scamen were the people to look at the intersection of democracy and public often opinion data in the 1970 book "the real majority." they told us how important changing demographics would be to future e elections come indigenous election de pass braking ins
marching from one place to another in florida, which was really the first site of the men to most americans at that time. what that did was set in motion a moment that led to a war against the seminole indians, one of the overlooked moments in our past, which is something also try to do, tell the stories that the textbooks to leave out. most americans have never heard of the longest most costly war in american history up until vietnam, which was the seminole war fought in florida. so that moment was as gripping and astonishing in a way to people about time as 9/11 was to bus. pearl harbor certainly was again. to each generation has had one of these moment that we do forget that we've been through this before. obviously, we are going through right now in a sense. i'm a new yorker. i ensure new york and we are living through this extraordinary moment. i just want to say briefly thank you to the people who are expressing such concern and care for new york and this region. we have a long way to go and a lot to do. on my way into the studio this morning, i was remembered thomas jefferson's words
. >> while they are still counts voting in florida -- [inaudible] >> [inaudible] >> it's not on? oh, there's a greener light. i apologize. [laughter] i saw the green light, too subtle for me, but i hope we're on now. here's what we know. we certainly know the president was re-elected, democrats picked up seats in the senate, which is contrary to what anybody in washington, i think, thought, even as late as labor day. we know the house is going to stay roughly the same. absent breaking news, i bring you no precinct returns from florida. i'd like to spend more time on why this is happened, and what that means for us going forward. first, i share the admiration all around for president obama's campaign team. they were tech nickically close to perfect in the first responsibility of a campaign team, that is to identify and turn out voters. they planned it. they executed it. every step of the way, they knew what votes they needed, got out and got them. they began weeks before election day banking favorable votes in states where they had already had people on the ground preplabbed to produce. aga
of this relatively narrow popular vote margin. assuming that he carries florida where he is the current ahead in the miami-dade county. people are are this year counting votes without the assistance of many republican and democratic lawyers. with florida his electoral vote victory is 332-206. bush was 51-48 margin in 2004 india 286 votes and obama was slightly less it appears against 332. i think there is a certain structure of demographic advantage for democrats in the electoral college in this era. democratic voters tend to be clustered into large metropolitan areas and in particular neighborhoods and they give them a craft an initial advantage in the electoral college. president obama got 57% or more of the popular vote in 11 states and the district of columbia and they have 163 electoral votes. romney won 13 states by such margins but they only have 104 electoral votes of basically the democrats have a bigger hunting ground and and a larger base in the electoral college and the mere hunting ground to go find those votes and barack obama into campaigns has been successful with 365 and appa
? the presiding officer: the senator from florida. mr. nelson: mr. president, before the senator from new jersey leaves the floor, i just want to say that this senator's heart goes out to you and your people. we take hurricanes more as a part of our lifestyle from florida, but when you combine a hurricane in the northeast at this time of year, during a full moon at high tide in one of the most densely populated coastal areas of the united states, then you definitely have a problem. and this senator wants to help you with what's going to be necessary with additional funding of fema and so forth. i want the senator to think about an idea that we implemented in florida to create in effect a reassurance fund against this kind of catastrophe. we call it the florida hurricane catastrophe fund. this was done when i was the elected insurance commissioner prior to me, and then i had to implement it in the aftermath of the monster hurricane in the early 1990's, hurricane andrew. as i have talked to our colleagues in the senate about a national catastrophic fund, people in other parts of the country don't
? >> they are still counting votes in florida and -- [inaudible] bears and even greener light. i apologize. i saw that little green light and you know, it was too subtle for me. here is what we know. we certainly know that the president was reelected and we know democrats have picked up seats in the house and the senate which is contrary to what anybody in washington i think god even as -- we know they house will stay roughly the same so with his breaking news i bring you know that returns from florida and i like to spend more time on why he did this happen and what does that mean for us going forward? first, i share the admiration all around for president obama's campaign team. they were technically close to perfect in the first responsibility of the campaign team and that is to identify and turn out voters. they planned it, they executed it and every step of the way they knew what votes they needed and they went out and got them. they began weeks before election day thanking favorable votes in states where they have our people on the ground preplanned so again technically a superb operation and
out, florida, virginia, which were going to be my next two states he would need to win and they are still undecided at this point. with obama slightly ahead in both of them. basically it looks like it stopped. but he would've needed to do florida and virginia and then would need to get into colorado, iowa, new hampshire and still even winning all of that was going to be pretty short to 70. so it was pretty clear, you know, going into election day that away, a whole lot had to have been right for romney to get over the 270 and it just didn't happen. it just seemed to peter out either after north carolina and a sequencer may be either florida or virginia once all the votes had counted or theoretically both probably not. that's theretofore applies. and there was one point back around just looking at the sequencing of it. romney was clearly dead in the water, just not moving. he was that far behind before the first debate. it looks like a really hard three to five points. and you got a sense and i had a chance to look at what wal-mart moms focus groups and focus groups that
is probably tracking her down. even though she might be more personable candidate in the race. >> florida, congressman alan west, a tea party republican trying to keep his seat for a second term. >> alan west running against patrick murphy, not former congressman patrick murphy of california -- pennsylvania but this is one of the most expensive and nastiest races in the country. i think that the district by the numbers is very competitive but alan west is tenacious. right now he is running probably three times the amount of television and that a number candidate would run at this stage. even though he is polarizing, he's also strategic. former military officer and patrick murphy, he has a tough task i think in coming across spent an interesting race in utah, the fourth congressional district. a republican, african-american, the race is getting a lot of attention. >> jim matheson, democrats regarding is one of the survivors, but he survived a 20 republican wave in a republican district. but i think that republicans didn't really target confidence and a lot of money trying to feed him in 20
becomes the president at least in part because of the ballot design in florida and the weather in the florida panhandle so i can't think of anything more random than the weather in florida so random facts obviously have an impact. if you run history a million times those random events make different people when, different likelihoods of winning. if you could run that election a million times you get george w. bush 400,000 times and al gore 400,000 times in and john mccain 400,000 times. people who are at the center of the distribution, people who are really likely to win, people who live in thoroughly tilted by the process, from another way i describe it is filtered, they have a lot in common with each other. but if you can get power, by bypassing the process and if something happens of the leader filtration process isn't able to thoroughly evaluate you and in the evaluation process recognize you are not what it's looking for forward ever reason, and stops you from getting powered, then those people i call them unfiltered can be on the extreme of the distribution of people who
discussed in the media, you have to look at the next agenda and you have to look at ohio and florida. if romney, if lightning were to strike and romney were to carry all three of the states than he is very much in the game to win the election. is on the other hand, if obama were to carry at least two of those three states then i believe romney cannot win the election. if romney carries two and obama carries one of those three states and we will be up late at night watching the electoral college to see how things turn out. i'm not sure that this election has to drag on until the wee hours. i think we may have a good indication by the midnight at least as to where we stand, depending on what happens in those three states. >> you have absentee voting and they don't report that early in those places. >> i don't know how it is because the elections are not run by the government. in texas the absentee voting is reported at 7:00 p.m.. those are the first results. >> erlang foti -- [inaudible] they voted over a year ago. [laughter] >> i am talking about the mailed ballot absentees and the ab
of the ballot design in florida and the weather in the florida panhandle. there's nothing more random than the weather in florida. if you run history a million times, random events make different people win -- different likely hoods of winning. running that election a million times, you get george w. bush 400,000 times and john mccain 100,000 times. a lot of people. people who are at the center of the distribution, likely to win, people who have been thoroughly evaluated, filtered by the process. another way i describe it is filtered leaders. they are similar. they have a lot in common p each -- a lot in common with each other. if you get power by bypassing the process, something happens so the process is not able to thoroughly evaluate you, and in the process recognize that you are not what it is looking for for whatever reason and stop you from gaining power, then those people, i call them unfitterred, can be on the extreme of that distribution of people who might possibly gain power. >> host: so these people are not stopped, even though the deck is stacked against them? >> guest: that's
and hercules. components that are all built in florida. he even voted against body armor for troops our troops on the frontline of the war on terror. john kerry's record on national security is troubling. >> it is the same exact ad. the ads are more targeted these days. this is the florida version of that advertisement. all of the focus these days on swing states and targeting the swing states. it is the same identical message. this is something i'm not very proud of the, but what i found out recently was we did an event in 2008. mark mckinnon was one of the guest speakers and he created ads for the bush campaign in 2004. he said that he was actually a fan of this website and he knew about this website and he would look at it to try to get ideas and go back to a past campaign. so i will give you an example of an advertisement. and i'm not saying this proudly. but it was interesting to me to learn this. when we think about the reagan outcome we can do this norman rockwell series of positive ads that make people feel good about the way america was coming back. this ad was actually very effective
their policies, mitigate risk at their institutions and make their campuses safer. from california to florida state have introduced the child abuse reporting, not only moral duty but the law. this is tremendous progress, policies tighten, governance and institutions made safer. and work continues. that brings us to today on the brink of a 1-year anniversary, civil lawsuits, perjury trials and we can expect more fallout to come. over the last year we have learned much about ourselves. many cultures, values and visions. we are working through some difficult issues but the question remains where do we go from here? to penn state's core mission, teaching research and service. our bottom line is delivering outstanding education to students. students are the top priority. our students are our top priority. this year our journalism students capture the national championship and the william randolph hearst foundation's journalism award program. top honors in the national eco car competition, the others racing to get their vehicle to the moon in the google and x prize competition. meteorology students
an amendment to the florida house of representatives and we will overturn this. and they said that we will send an e-mail out and you can try, but you will fail. i worked with people on both sides of the aisle. anyone who had supported broadband in the past, when it came time for the vote, we had 90 republicans and 91 democrats and we made a bipartisan effort. i have worked with senator gillibrand in nanotechnology, that resulted in great competitive values and i have worked with peter welch to ensure we had funding that was fema and money for farmers and roads and bridges and that was a bipartisan effort. with peter welch. i can tell you that i absolutely believe, that even though you hear all the negative news today, folks can come together -- we have come together and we did it in transportation and we did with fair trade agreements and we did for other loss. i will continue to do that because that is my responsibility. >> moderator: julian schriebman, do you have a rebuttal? schriebman: absolutely. we need to make a commitment for a public and private partnership. the congressman brags that
of the weather in the florida panhandle. i can't think of any more random. if you run history a million times they would make people win differently cui hodes you would get george w. bush 400,000 times and al gore 400,000 times and john mccain 100,000 times. people that are at the center of the distribution, people that are likely to win, people that have been thoroughly evaluated and filtered by the process. another way with filtered leaders they are very similar. they have a lot in common with each other. but if you can get power in bypassing the process of something happens so that the filtration process isn't able to thoroughly evaluate you in the dalia vision process recognizing that you are not what it is looking for for whatever reason and stopped you from getting power boats can be in the end of the distribution of people that might gain power. >> host: these people are not stopped even though the back is stacked. >> guest: sometimes it might not be stacked against them to the evaluation process can't be triggered if you inherit the control of your company you are inheriting said the
. they were french. they made wine. they had the good sense to land in florida in june and set of december in massachusetts, but then they were wiped out by the spanish. the most famous woman in america, she was taken captive by indians in 1695, marched in new hampshire. in the middle of the night she killed her captor timmer realized she could get a bounty for scalps from indian scout spirit schuett back on the scalp them and made her way to boston. they actually erected a statue to her. the first statue, showed her with a hatchet in one hand and scalps in the other. >> army chief of staff, general ray odierno talked about how the military is prepared for the future. he discussed the challenge of maintaining the readiness of smaller troop levels in the shift out of iraq and afghanistan. the center for strategic and international studies hosted this hour-long event. [inaudible conversations] >> years ago -- [inaudible] auditorium at a podium. >> the microphone isn't on. [inaudible] >> welcome to the center for strategic and international studies. that sounds real. good morning welcome to e
their campuses safer. states from california to florida have introduced legislation to make it clear that child abuse reporting is not only a moral duty, but it's the law. this is tremendous progress. laws strengthens, policies tightened, governance revisited, and institutions made safer, and our work continues. that brings us to today, on the brink of the one year anniversary, civil lawsuits, perjury trials, and we can expect more fallout to come. over the last year, we have learned much about ourselves, our many cultures, our values, and our vision. we're still working through some difficult issues, but the question remains where do we go from here? the answer can be found by returning to penn state's core mission -- teaching, research, and service. our bottom line is delivering an outstanding education to students. our students are our top priority. i repeat, our students are our top priority, and they are doing great things. for example, this year, our journalism students captured the national championship in the william randolff hurst journalism award. engineering students took top honors
cooperatively with the issue. i guess i have the florida chance to ask the question what the this notion of lots of different well-meaning and well-intentioned and capable organizations coming together. often it's around the disaster, but i think we need to think also about how to do it anymore preteen time. i think there's two different pieces and sometimes we mix them up. at the country team level, mr. ambassador, it's really in those kinds of times, providing the forum to orchestrate all of these so that you have the best capabilities doing the things they can do best. i'm curious if you have some ideas about that. we put teams in place and then sit back or try to bring folks together. i'm curious if you have a sense of how that could be done better. >> first of all, it's a lot of it is done very well. we have very capable people -- [inaudible] but i think there is no substitute the element being is outside the embassy. unfortunately over the last generation, were more active inside and we talk to each other, we want information from what google information. you have to go meet people and ask
started, in florida is begun in other places as well, kill the messenger. blame it on the tests. blame it on somebody. blame it on the former governor. there's all sorts of people that you can blame this stuff on, but the simple fact is if we are going to restore american greatness, which we all want, whether we are liberals or conservatives, we have to start with higher expectations for the next generation. the states that retreat on record will be shortchanging their children, and putting them at a competitive disadvantage. not only with kids from other states, but also with kids from other nations. if we've learned one lesson from reform, it is this. we continually underestimate children. setting high standards and demanding results drive student academic angst. far from getting dumber, the students in kentucky are on their way to getting smarter. it will take them adjustment, but our kids will rise to the challenge of these new standards if we give them the opportunity and tools to do. corporations that depend on students being in college and/or career ready when they graduate from
the assignments. we got a letter from a high school student in florida who said here's what she does to complete your assignment that would require internet access. she drives to her local library at night after it is closed, and sits in the parking lot where she can get wi-fi hookup. but that's not a good answer the digital divide is a good issue and smart government action can help drive universal access. this is what drove the fcc last year to adopt a once in a generation comprehensive overhaul of the $4.5 billion a year universal service fund. we transformed it from a telephone focused program and one at that, too inefficient program focus on universal broadband. so these pillars and priorities not only guide our policy work in the united states. they guide our international engagement in the i.t. sector. and they have in the past, historically. in ways that it had a profound affect. to explain how, let me take a detour into the arab spring. in egypt last year, when they can shut down the internet, shutdown global service, many asked how are they able to do that. what does it mean they can d
. they were french. they made wine. they had the good sense to land in florida in june the third of december massachusetts, but then they were wiped out by the spanish but the story was completely left out of textbooks for the most famous woman in america was taken captive by anand in 1865, march new hampshire. in the middle of the night she killed her capture, realized she could get a bounty for scalps, went back on the scalp them and made her way to boston where she was a. the first statute to an american woman, a permit statue shutter with a hatchet in one hand and scalps in the other. >> hurricanes and he is now believed to be one of the costliest natural disasters with insured losses estimated to be as much as $20 billion. we discussed the national flood insurance program and how the insurance companies are responding to sandy with an industry representative. this is a half-hour. postcode let me introduce you to john prible, vice president of the independent insurance agents and brokers of america. our topic is the national insurance program. mr. purple, this article was in "the wall st
, florida, where they have the republican convention, to charlotte where democrats had their convention, fort bragg, back to charlotte, washington. that's 26 cds. [laughter] but i have this image of lyndon johnson spinning in his grave at the idea that there is a president of the united states that has minimal interaction with congress. and particularly someone of his own party. and when you, let's just forget republicans and let's forget tea party people. forget them. just in his own party, wander around the hill as all of you to around all the time and ask members of the democratic at how much personal interaction you have with the president. and i have, you know, i hate giving political credit for anything, but they had that piece back in may. just pointed out that the president, as of may when that article was written, had not had a single conversation this year with this year weedeater kent conrad, chairman of the senate budget committee, or tom harkin, the chairman of the senate health education labor binge committee. phone or in person this year. now, you can talk about tea party
to miami. they're rolling back and forth in the florida sun. my family knew nothing about how to care champagne. when my daughter was born i said, i'm going to write a book that lasts for whole life. underwriter, novelist. all right a book for her. all fill it with a gray years that i can find to my including lisa simpson and rosa parks and amelya air force -- amelya earhart. i should tell you, i thought i was going to the right advice. a friend of mine saw me this amazing story. sally ride, america's first female astronaut in space collided as a picker? of all people, why her? and some say it's because she is a physics geniuses and others say it's because she was a great athlete, which she was, i dare devil, which she was gone but the real reason is because nasa took out an ad in her college newspaper, and basically said, we are looking for female astronauts and will you come. she took an opportunity, side, and seized it. i want my daughter to learn that lesson. i want her to learn if she wants something gst go after it. that is what it really is, way to give for those euros, as far
've made up our mind. we're going to zero this out. i said i'm going to bring an amendment to the florida house of representatives were going to overturn this. they laughed and said you're new around here, aren't you? were going to send to the party and tell them you can try, but she'll fail. i would not have worked with souls on both sides of the aisle. anyone who is support broadband the past, astrologer and the north country halted when it came time for the vote we again the republicans and 131 democrats and we overturn the leadership by working together, a bipartisan affair. i've also worked with senator gillibrand. that was authorization and appropriation to compete for it. it's good for our country from a distance, area. work with peter watched to ensure we had funding for the storm relief. that was a bipartisan effort with peter welch. so i can tell you i absolutely believe even though you hear negative news, folks can come together, we've come together and we did and transportation of free-trade agreements and for advanced training lot and i will continue to will continue to do th
from florida. mr. nelson: mr. president, the chairman has asked me to manage the bill in the meantime while he is working out with the leadership a list of amendments, so seeing no other senator that wants to speak at this point, if i may then, i will talk about an amendment that would be offered in the future. mr. president, i'm going to offer an amendment to repeal the offset in the department of defense and the v.a. benefits for military widows and widowers the stand-alone bill, s. 260, has wide support from military organizations and has 51 cosponsors in the senate. this is the ninth time that i have and will bring this amendment to the defense authorization act, and it's passed the senate six times over the past decade, including last year by voice vote. the senate has supported eliminating this offset for years, and i hope that this body will remain steadfast in its support for military widows and the survivors. mr. president, you will recall in a number of addresses that president lincoln gave that he spoke of the responsibility that the government has to take care of the veter
Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)